Identifying And Overcoming Your Quarter-Life Crisis

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A couple posts back, I talked about quitting my 40-hour-per-week office job to pursue a career as a freelance travel writer. I did this to follow my dreams; however, it’s also an attempt to solve my ongoing quarter-life crisis.

Becoming a grown-up is scary business, and people often panic as the path through life becomes less clear-cut. Some will wish they’d chosen a different career, studied something else in school, or just attended or finished college in general. People who moved home after college may also feel like they’re trapped in their hometown forever. I stayed in my university city for 2 years after graduation, and I was feeling stuck there.

Fortunately, it’s never too late to change the course of your life! Here’s my step-by-step guide to recognizing the signs of and handling your quarter-life crisis.…

The 3-Step Plan To Map Your Financial Future

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Maybe you don’t think of yourself as much of a cartographer, but you should never set out on a journey without a plan of how to arrive at your destination. And that includes traveling into your financial future.

As 20-somethings, it often feels like we have to manage so many financial obligations just to stay afloat. Because of this, it can be hard to look past the next payday—let alone to the next year or decade. However, it’s essential to think about your finances in a long-term context. Here’s a three-step plan to help you do it.…

“The More Debt You Have, The More Impact It Has On Your Goals”

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You’ve gotten a job, moved out of your parents’ house, and you’re steadily chipping away at those student loans. Now what?

Beth Napper graduated from college in 1999 and wanted to figure out how to manage her own money, which naturally turned into a career as a financial adviser, helping others understand how to manage theirs. Here, she tells our own Aaron Weber about the importance of savings, as well as debt’s impact on it.…

“It Is Amazingly Easy To Choose To Not Save And Invest For The Future”

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You’ve gotten a job, moved out of your parents’ house, and you’re steadily chipping away at those student loans. Now what?

Beth Napper graduated from college in 1999 and wanted to figure out how to manage her own money, which naturally turned into a career as a financial adviser, helping others understand how to manage theirs. Here, she talks about what it means to plan ahead for savings, family, and (gulp) retirement, as told to our own Aaron Weber.…