5 Things To Avoid When Writing A Financial Aid Appeal Letter

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This post is mainly for students who have had their financial aid suspended for unsatisfactory academic performance or other status-changing circumstances (such as being the subject of disciplinary action).

However, those of you who are writing appeal letters to negotiate for more financial aid might find this useful as well. Here are five things you’ll want to avoid in writing your financial aid appeal letter.…

The Financial Aid Appeal Letter

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If you’re watching this video, then chances are you’re in a situation where your financial aid award has been suspended.

Any financial aid you receive will have strings attached, and if you don’t play by the rules, your financial aid can be suspended. If you don’t know what those rules are, you’d better find out ASAP to prevent this from happening.…

The SALT Financial Aid Comparison Tool

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If you are in the position where you’ve received more than one financial aid award letter and need to compare them, then congrats! Hats off to you for both being accepted into multiple schools and putting yourself in a position where you can now choose the best financial aid outcome!

Now, the tough part: accomplishing an apples-to-apples comparison of your financial aid award letters.…

Understanding Your Financial Aid Award Letter

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A financial aid award letter is a document that your school will send you after you’ve completed your required financial aid applications. It outlines all of the financial aid being offered to you by both the federal government and your school.

Keep in mind that this is an offer of financial aid and you don’t have to accept everything they offer you. For example, if your financial aid includes a small loan and you don’t want or need that loan, you can say “no thanks” to that loan without affecting your other aid.…

What Is The CSS Profile IDOC Form?

Nope. The IDOC isn’t that kind of dock.
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The Institutional Documentation Service (IDOC) form is essentially part II of the College Scholarship Service (CSS) Profile financial aid application process. It’s a document verification tool managed by the College Board. Basically, a school may need more information than what the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) requests in order to calculate your financial need. The IDOC collects important documents (such as your tax returns and other financial documents), and sends that information to your school.…

Everything You Need To Know About The CSS Profile Financial Aid Form

The CSS Profile may seem like a hassle, but it actually saves you from extra paperwork.
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The College Scholarship Service (CSS) Profile is a financial aid application used by some private colleges and universities. It requires more asset information than the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)—such as what kind of car your parents drive and how much they have saved in their retirement accounts—in order for the school to get a better picture of your financial circumstances.…

The CSS Profile Financial Aid Application

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The CSS Profile is used by private colleges and universities to help them determine how much non-federal financial aid to award. Basically, the government uses the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to determine how much aid you can receive, while private colleges use the CSS Profile. So, if you want to receive financial aid from both your college and the federal government (and your school requires the CSS profile), then you’ll have to complete both applications. The good news is that the CSS profile requires the same documentation as the FAFSA—so there isn’t a lot of additional work.…

When And How To Apply For College Financial Aid

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Contrary to popular belief, completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) does not automatically mean that you’ve applied for financial aid from your college. The FAFSA is how you apply for money from the federal government (and colleges use this information as a part of their award process). However, often you’ll have to complete another separate application in order to be considered for money from your school and/or your state. You do not have to do anything else to be considered for federal financial aid. Make sure that your school’s financial aid office knows that is your intent, otherwise they may think your application is incomplete.…

Hidden FAFSA Deadlines: 3 Financial Aid Deadlines You Don’t Want to Miss

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The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) opens on January 1 and closes on or around June 30 each year. While a 6-month window may seem like a lot of time, that doesn’t mean that you can wait until the last minute to file your application.

At least three other organizations might have deadlines for you to submit the FAFSA that are significantly earlier than the FAFSA application window. Missing these key deadlines could mean missing out on a large chunk of financial aid—something many of us cannot afford to attend college without.…