Are You Taking Advantage Of These 5 Employer Benefits?

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A little while ago, my fellow SALT™ blogger Bridget wrote a great piece about considering total compensation when comparing job offers.

I’d like to take it a step further and talk about maximizing those benefits after you’ve started your job. After all, just because they offer the benefits doesn’t mean your employer will remind (or require) you to use them.

Here are five you’ll want to make sure you take advantage of.…

3 Reasons To Manage Expectations For Your Family’s College Contribution

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Award letter season is right around the corner. And with it, I’ve been thinking about what’s realistic for a family to contribute when paying for college—especially in this age of students suing parents for tuition.

My husband and I take an “oxygen mask” approach to our finances, i.e., we apply our own before assisting our children. In other words, if we couldn’t fund both equally, we’d allocate money to our retirement before our kids’ college tuitions, even if that meant not meeting the “expected” family contribution listed in an award letter.

You might dislike the idea of your parents thinking more about their own future than yours; however, it makes sense. Here are three reasons why.…

“It Is Amazingly Easy To Choose To Not Save And Invest For The Future”

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You’ve gotten a job, moved out of your parents’ house, and you’re steadily chipping away at those student loans. Now what?

Beth Napper graduated from college in 1999 and wanted to figure out how to manage her own money, which naturally turned into a career as a financial adviser, helping others understand how to manage theirs. Here, she talks about what it means to plan ahead for savings, family, and (gulp) retirement, as told to our own Aaron Weber.…

How to Save for Retirement in Your 20s

Money Knowledge for college and beyond
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I was sifting through my mail the other day and came across one of my favorite finance reads: T. Rowe Price’s Investor magazine (I know, I’m a nerd).

One article in particular caught my eye. Entitled Saving Now Can Add Up Later, Building Wealth Through Compounding, this article detailed how saving for retirement in your 20s can help you build long-term wealth.…