A Journey Of Cracked Cellphone Screens And Broken Dreams

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Before last year, I had never had a nice cell phone. I always settled for what was free with my upgrade or a hand-me-down. It never really bothered me.

However, when I last found myself in need of a new phone, Apple had just released the iPhone 5. I was tempted and decided to splurge some of my savings on the latest and greatest.

A friend explained that this would be great for me now and later, because my next contract would likely begin around the launch of the next iPhone in 2 years. There is, however, a major flaw in this plan: it is very, very difficult to keep one cell phone for 2 full years.

The Dos And Don’ts Of Spending Your First Paycheck

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It’s not often that the SALT™ Blog advocates spending a little money. We generally preach about keeping the pockets tight.

But we aren’t monsters!

We know how exciting the rush of getting your first paycheck can be; I recently discovered this joy after landing my first full-time post-college job. Of course, I also discovered how easy it can be to go overboard with spending.

Crowning The SALT Blog’s March Madness Champion

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College basketball is by far my favorite sport, and the tournament is my favorite event of the year. (Let’s not mention that I’ll be working during the games today and tomorrow. I could write 10 blog posts about how to follow the games at work, but that won’t lead to anything productive.)

Last year, I wrote about the madness, and I did it big—creating my own money-savvy, SALT™-centric metric to fill out a bracket: JAM Score. The post was one of my most read, and ESPN’s resident bracketologist Joe Lunardi even retweeted my tweet about it.

So, would we retire the JAM Score after its one shining moment and move on? Of course not! Hit the music, Quad City DJs! LET’S JAM!

How Many Part-Time Jobs Equal One Full-Time Job?

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Over the last couple months, I’ve chronicled my quest to find a full-time job. Despite not finding one yet, I still need money coming in. After all, I recently began to pay off my student loans and continue to be a functioning 23-year-old human being.

In order to manage that, I’ve been collecting part-time jobs. I now have three of them. Part-time, freelance, consulting—they all have different agreements and requirements, but essentially, I have three jobs, all of which I do from my home.

Do these fit all the needs someone might have met by a full-time job? Not exactly. And here’s why.

What We Learned From This Year’s Super Bowl Ads (Besides Who’s The Coolest Lawyer In America)

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Millions of Americans who care very little about football go to Super Bowl parties to enjoy guacamole and see some very expensive marketing efforts. These ads are usually full of laughs and heartfelt moments, but most importantly, they teach hidden financial lessons.

So, like I did last year (a year the game was actually more entertaining than the ads), I’m highlighting what we can learn from the best ads of the Super Bowl XLVIII. (And thanks to 4 years of high school Latin and a lifetime of deep football fanhood, I didn’t have to look that Roman numeral up!)

How To Tackle A New Year Of Job Hunting

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Because I graduated in May (which feels like a LIFETIME ago), it hasn’t actually been a year since my job search started. We have, however, entered the second calendar year of my search. And even if that difference feels arbitrary, it’s human nature to reflect on the past year and look forward to a new one.

As I flip my search from 2013 to 2014, I know several aspects of it will change in the new year. However, I hope that everything I’ve learned so far still leads to an employment opportunity. Here are three big lessons that I hope will help your search as well.