3 Networking Tips That Can Help You Land A Job

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Last April, I finished my first TV gig in NYC. I was happy to work on what I studied. Plus, it’s quite gratifying when you see your name on TV.

Unfortunately, a few months of “funemployment” followed. I started to lose hope and thought I’d never work on another production. I applied to a barista job; I took on more babysitting hours; I reconsidered going back to school—you know, the normal existential crisis a post-grad has.

And then, just when I was about to give up, an email with an exciting opportunity appeared. That’s when I realized all my networking tactics were working. I could breathe easy again.

4 Ways You Can Have A Budget-Friendly Summer

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Summer is my favorite time of the year—and not just because my birthday falls right in the middle of it. The good weather that comes with the endless “summer daze” means more outside events and, with that, endless possibilities for good times.

This will be my first summer in New York City, as well as my first summer as a freelancer. In order to keep up with my loan payments/survive New York, I have to be extra conscious about my spending.

With that in mind, I made a few “suggestions” to myself that I encourage you to follow for a budget-friendly summer.

3 Ways Undergrads Can Become Financial Pros Before Graduation

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Here in NYC, the subway is packed with the latest batch of new hopefuls entering the workforce. As I zigzag through them, I wonder how many have loans—and how many are freaking out about the whole “paying back” thing.

This made me start to think about all the small decisions I could have made while in school to positively affected my repayment process. I can’t turn back time. But if I want to keep my job as “best big sister” to the little goose, I can help him prepare for his student loans now that he’s done with high school and heading to Syracuse University.

If you still have time left in school (whether it’s 1 year or 4), take advantage of these tips too.

Freelancing Too “Free”? How To Successfully Make Money On The Side

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It’s been a year since I graduated. Can you believe that? I can’t.

I still think of myself as a “recent graduate” who has just been set free into the real world. In a few days, there will be a plethora of Facebook status updates and “hello real world party” invites from the graduating class of 2014. It’s official. I’ve been in the workforce for a year now. Well, technically.

Truth is, freelancing doesn’t feel like being part of the work force—especially since you have to find other jobs to help you make due.

I Wasn’t Expecting This Expense

Things happened, that's a given. So make sure as prepared as you can.
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Earlier this month, I received news from back home that my uncle Rafo passed away. When I first heard the news that he was diagnosed with an aggressive brain tumor back in January, I knew that I had to prepare to travel at a moment’s notice since well, la vida es impredecible (Life is unpredictable). I didn’t expect him to leave so soon. I had managed to save up a few bucks but almost not enough.

Why Freelancing Is Not Really “Free”

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I dove into the freelance world right after college with a few ideas on how the whole thing worked. My professors talked about it constantly during those last weeks of class, and this gave me a taste of what I’d deal with after graduation day.

“Never leave your house without a business card,” they said. “A written thank you card can get you places.” Their stories gave me an idea of what it meant to be a freelancer, but they didn’t tell me how much it would cost me—literally.

A Love Letter To My Tax Refund

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So, you’re single on Valentine’s Day in New York City. But that doesn’t stop you from getting into the spirit of things. New York has that charm about it. It’s not sad; there are a lot a of couples enjoying the day, as well as a lot of friends enjoying each other’s company.

Being the sappy romantic that I sometimes secretly am, I wrote a few love letters in honor of today’s holiday. Maybe three. And well, I’d thought I’d share the one that made the most sense for this here blog: a love letter to my tax refund.

(And if you think writing a letter to money is strange, you haven’t been paying attention.)

Understanding The FAFSA When English Or “Financial Aid” Isn’t Your First Language

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I miss a lot of things about college. My friends. The campus. Those rare, fun classes.

One thing I will never miss? Filling out that darn Free Application for Student Aid (FAFSA) at the start of every year. I thought that, once I graduated, I would never have to deal with that long, intense, wordy application again.

I was wrong.

Answering Those Wonderful Parental Questions In Post-Grad Life

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So far, becoming an adult has entailed dealing with a series of obstacles like, “How does one make rent again?” Oh, and, “Am I already facing a life crisis?”

I figured out those answers for the time being, but some questions I just don’t have any answers to yet. Some questions I never even asked myself before. These often come from my older family members—especially when talking about my post-grad life.