How Do You Define Success?

There is no picture of success next to the definition in the dictionary. Coincidence? We think not.
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Blogger and novelist John Scalzi wrote a moving piece this past winter titled “How I Knew I’d Made It,” about … well, the moment he knew he was doing pretty well in his career. He says it was when he bought a tank of gas and didn’t worry about how much it cost. Just being able to fill up and know that whether he was spending on gas today didn’t really matter. He finally had the cash flow to not be constantly worried about overdrafts.

“The More Debt You Have, The More Impact It Has On Your Goals”

Injured Piggy Bank WIth Crutches
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You’ve gotten a job, moved out of your parents’ house, and you’re steadily chipping away at those student loans. Now what?

Beth Napper graduated from college in 1999 and wanted to figure out how to manage her own money, which naturally turned into a career as a financial adviser, helping others understand how to manage theirs. Here, she tells our own Aaron Weber about the importance of savings, as well as debt’s impact on it.

Financial Aid Talk: “Don’t Avoid Applying To A College Because Of Its Cost”

joanne dashiell
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Joanne Dashiell has worked in financial aid and college access programming for over 10 years. Today, she’s at American Student Assistance® (ASA) helping colleges implement SALT™.

She spoke with Aaron Weber about what it takes to make sure you get all the financial aid you’re eligible for, how to understand financial aid award letters, and what to do if it’s not enough.

“Every Student Is A Lot More Than What The Admissions Office Sees On Paper”

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Lori Connor has worked in admissions and financial aid for 15 years. Today, she helps school implement SALT™ for parent company, American Student Assistance®. Since we’re right in the middle of college application season, Aaron Weber asked her to tell us about admissions, money, and transferring to new schools.

“It Is Amazingly Easy To Choose To Not Save And Invest For The Future”

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You’ve gotten a job, moved out of your parents’ house, and you’re steadily chipping away at those student loans. Now what?

Beth Napper graduated from college in 1999 and wanted to figure out how to manage her own money, which naturally turned into a career as a financial adviser, helping others understand how to manage theirs. Here, she talks about what it means to plan ahead for savings, family, and (gulp) retirement, as told to our own Aaron Weber.

4 Questions Borrowers Always Ask About Their First Loan Payment

Mike and Christa
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If you graduated in May, your grace period is ending and your first student loan payments will be due any week now. Are you ready? Confused? Scared?

Aaron Weber spoke with Mike and Christa, two of the most experienced student loan counselors with SALT™, about the most common questions borrowers ask when they call them. Check out their answers.

Grad School In My Late 30s: “The Best Thing I’ve Ever Done For My Career”

david b. riding in car
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Everyone follows their own path for education, and some paths take more twists and turns than others. Not sure where your education is taking you? It can help to see how things went for other people who have been there.

When David B. was in high school, he wasn’t sure he’d go to college at all. Spoiler: He did, but it took a long time. When he was 38, he went back for more, and got a master’s degree. More than a few years after that, he shared his experience with Aaron Weber.

“It’s Not Just The Low Pay—Adjunct Teaching Often Involves Low Morale”

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Should you go to grad school? What should you study? What’s the career path like for social science majors? Aaron Weber talked with an anonymous young professor to get the real scoop on paying for grad school, osteology (the study of bones), and suffering academic survivor’s guilt. Check out what this person had to say.