Organize All Your Debt At Once With Help From SALT

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Sometimes, the hardest part about debt is keeping track of it all. (OK, paying off the actual “debt” is tougher, but we swear the management is a not-too-distant second for many of us.)

Here at SALT™, we like to think we can help you with the former, through articles, videos, and more that educate you on topics like student loan repayment options and why you should love your budget. But now, we know we can help you with the latter—thanks to the newest tool on our site.

Jay-Z And Kanye Talk Personal Finance

Money is number one to both Hova and Yeezy … but they think about it in very different ways.
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Money’s always been a popular topic in hip-hop, but mostly in in the boastful, look-how-much-cash-I’ve-got” kind of way. There are some exceptions, though. For example, Macklemore’s “Thrift Shop” won our attention a while ago as a tribute to frugal shopping. And, of course, there are other financial lessons to be learned from some hip-hop songs, even if they aren’t specifically about money.

Hey, Financial Aid Office! Is That All You’ve Got?!

“Lilacs out of the dead land,” indeed, T.S.!
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In The Waste Land, T.S Eliot calls April “the cruelest month.” With colleges sending out their financial aid awards and finishing off their enrollment, April is an important month for a lot of college students and incoming freshmen who depend on financial aid to attend the schools of their dreams. Eliot wasn’t too far off, I think.

Scholarship Of The Month: The Gallagher Student Health Careers Scholarship Program

This scholarship might just be your “Wonderwall,” after all.
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The Gallagher Student Health Careers Scholarship is open to all college juniors and seniors planning to pursue a career in a health-related field. I’m featuring this scholarship because it’s broad (open to just about any major that’s even somewhat related to health), and offers a large award ($5,000) to a group of students (6 students will win this scholarship).

Where I Look For Jobs

Behold the magic of the Internet! You can find almost anything online these days.
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Before the internet became just a huge platform for communication, people didn’t get interviews by sending résumés and cover letters via e-mail or through online forms. You had to look at the classifieds in the newspaper or know someone at the company who could tell you about available positions. Then, you had to either send your résumé through snail-mail or actually go to the company in person to drop it off. The internet changed all of that. But the Web can be overwhelming. Lucky for you, I’ve been using a few sites in my job search that I’ve found to be great resources.

Slouching Toward (And Planning For) Repayment

Former Intern Mike is well on his way to earning his merit badge in Student Loan Repayment.
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Being a real person has taught me quite a bit about budgeting and saving. While I’m still new to the world of big-boy finances, a key nugget that I’ve taken away already is that having a financial plan is important. Knowing how much per month I’m going to have to dedicate towards student loans will ultimately allow me to figure out how much will be left over for groceries, rent, and fun. With things like an expired apartment lease looming in my future, I knew it was important to have my numbers hashed out this month.

5 Steps To Create A Student Loan Repayment Plan With Your Parents

Don’t leave any money on the table when you negotiate—even if it’s with your parents.
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Graduation is right (and I mean right) around the corner. With that has come more stress than I’ve had in my entire life. This is partially due to my fear of falling down while on stage. But until recently, I was also freaking out because my parents and I still hadn’t decided if/how they’d be helping me repay my student loans after graduation. I decided the time had come for us to make a real game plan—a game plan that’s clear, tactical, and allows my parents and me to beat these loans together. Here are some steps you can take that may help you make a plan with your parents.

Undocumented Students Can Get Aid, Too

These seats aren’t just for U.S. citizens.
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You applied to college and you got in. Congratulations! Why so blue? You’re an undocumented student and you can’t afford college on your own? I get it. The first eligibility qualification for federal student aid is “you must be a U.S. citizen or eligible noncitizen.” The second qualification for most (but not all) state aid—right after the one that says “you must be a resident of that state”—is “you must be a U.S. citizen or eligible noncitizen”. Don’t throw in the towel just yet! Sure, your options are limited—but you do have options.

What Is The CSS Profile IDOC Form?

Nope. The IDOC isn’t that kind of dock.
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The Institutional Documentation Service (IDOC) form is essentially part II of the College Scholarship Service (CSS) Profile financial aid application process. It’s a document verification tool managed by the College Board. Basically, a school may need more information than what the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) requests in order to calculate your financial need. The IDOC collects important documents (such as your tax returns and other financial documents), and sends that information to your school.